November 2008


The Innovation Asia-Pacific Symposium will take place from 4 to 7 May 2009 in Katmandu, innovation-asia_flyer-brochureNepal. PROLINNOVA is co-organising this symposium with ICIMOD (International Center for Integrated Mountain Dveelopment) and CIAT Asia. PROLINNOVA partners in Nepal – LI-BIRD and Practical Action are playing a leading role in all the activities leading up to the symposium. RIU has already committed itself to financially support the symposium and several other donors are considering funding.

The call for contributions and the brochure for the symposium are attached herewith:

Please feel free to pass this on to other interested individuals and organizations. More information is found on the website www.innovation-asia-pacific.net Closing date for submission of abstracts is 20 December 2008.

innovation-asia_flyer-call-for-contributions1The organisers hope that this symposium will be as successful as the Innovation Africa Symposium that was co-organised in Uganda in November 2006 and contribute to promoting local innovation and innovations systems in agriculture and NRM.

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In the Knowledge Sharing in Research(KSinR) project, the 6 Pilot Projects have beksinr-synthesis-workshop-014en piloting a range of knowledge sharing approaches in particular research projects, programs or domains. Their experiences have proven to be as diverse and interesting as their initially proposed approaches. Many of the Pilots have carried out a wide range of activities and experienced many things in using knowledge sharing in research.

In the previous exercises of the KSinR Synthesis Workshop the participants had been asked to describe and evaluate the whole host of activities, outputs and outcomes of their Projects.

In this session the Pilot projects were asked to present the most significant change thksinr-synthesis-workshop-165at they think has/had happened in using knowledge sharing in their research projects or domains. This was to be done through the use of the ‘Most Significant Change story approach’. Participants had been informed of this prior to arriving at the workshop and an explanation had been given on Day 1 to allow them to prepare their stories.

The question asked was:

” Looking back over time of implementing knowledge sharing philosophies and approaches in your research project, what do you think was the most significant change in the research project?”

On Day 2 the workshop moved out into the ILRI Campus gardens to present and listen to stories of most significant change from using knowledge sharing approaches in research.

The ‘most significant change’ stories consisted of:ksinr-synthesis-workshop-148

  1. From the IWMI Pilot Project ‘ Learning Alliances for Wastewater Agriculture and Sanitation for Poverty Alleviation (LA WASPA)’ the story presented by Alexandra Evans was about–
  • improved links between hygiene and wastewater use in agriculture
  • all research and actions that took place were known about and understood by all stakeholders involved
  • can work much easier with the various stakeholders after this experience

ksinr-synthesis-workshop-1462. From the IRRI Pilot Project ‘ Knowledge Management harmonising research output” the story presented by Ben Samson was about—

  • the initial workshop bringing together stakeholders brought about increased awareness and change in attitude of the various actors involved
  • the workshop provided a meeting point for people who needed something and those who could meet that need.

3. From the WorldFish Pilot Project ‘ Applying KS tools to Impact Monitoring and Project M&E” the story presented by Natasja Sheriff was about—

  • the way we (usually) do M&E in our projects is not very responsive
  • this Pilot Project provided an opportunity for Natasja to try something new out for her project and created a space for her to increase her own learning which she could then apply to other projects, share with others, and hope to influence how M&E is carried out in her institute

4. From the IWMI Pilot Project ‘ A Knowledge Sharing Approach to Safe Food”

—–a story presented by Tonya Schuetz was about—

  • a key thing that was done through this project focused on knowledge sharing was to increase and improve interactions with user groups
  • we sought feedback from stakeholders at many stages in the research process
  • through talking to potential users of the research results about the results and how messages could be effectively formulated helped the project to develop effective messages which lead to the achievement of early adoption of project recommended practices
  • took advantage of key opportunities such as the revision of the city by-laws and irrigation ksinr-synthesis-workshop-152policy which only happens every ten years
  • important to implement knowledge sharing throughout the research process

—–a story presented by Phillip Amoah was about—

  • we learned that it was necessary to work on a (national) policy level as well in order to support local action messages that we were trying to promote amongst farmers and caterers on the ground
  • it was important to work closely with the relevant ministries–in this case Ministry of Agriculture

ksinr-synthesis-workshop-1585. From the CIFOR Pilot Project ‘Shared Learning to Enhance Research Priority Assessment Practices’ the story presented by David Raitzer was about—

  • ex-ante has not previously had any systematic support
  • this was the first attempt to pull together methods and experiences and to find ways to give them visibility
  • there has been as a result of this work of this Pilot to share knowledge on this subject matter, been more attention to ex-ante and priority setting amongst those doing impact assessment

6. From the ICARDA Pilot Project ‘International Farmers Conference’ the story presented by Alessandra Galie was about—ksinr-synthesis-workshop-166

  • There was empowerment of women farmers through this process. For example Ruqeia a young female farmer was at first nervous to present her story but after she did she was congratulated by many participants of her good agricultural knowledge and skills. She then took the initiative to approach an FAO representative to ask for help on Integrated Pest Management which he had presented on.
  • The knowledge of women farmers was more appreciated and a greater recognition was gained in the institute that more efforts need to be made to include this in the Participatory Plant Breeding Program
  • The implementers became more aware of the fact that knowledge sharing approaches may need to be tailored to work with marginalised groups-thus it is necessary to refine approaches to be appropriate to varying types, uses, needs etc of knowledge by different groups.

For what happened next..stay tuned for the next blog post!

change-in-the-cgiarRecently I was introduced to Wordle, a tool for generating “word clouds” from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text.

So one week from the CGIAR Annual General Meeting to be held in Maputo, I looked at the CGIAR Change management Blog and generated a “wordle”…to see what were the most prominent ideas discussed in the blog. I thought a simple image would give me at a glance an idea of what really mattered to people. I do not think the image needs much commenting. And this is the nice thing about the tool, at a glance you can see what matters to people.

Another example of how technology can help!

If you have not seen it yet, you may be interested in reading the reform proposalthat will be discussed at the Annual General Meeting.

Change ahead…an opportunity to renew!

Thanks Peter, who manages the road to the horizon for showing me this tool! Today I also found the wordle advanced version, where you can generate your own clouds by adding words and the weight. A real powerful way to show ideas!

ksinr-synthesis-workshop-137Day 2 of the Synthesis Workshop (17-19 November 2008) of the Knowledge Sharing in Research project was heavily focused on learning. Building on the previous day of review and reflection, Day 2 was aimed at a much more defined and in-depth evaluation process of the Pilot projects and other KSinR activities towards learning.ksinr-synthesis-workshop-132

The first exercise in the agenda was to look at the projects in terms of what happened, what didn’t, what went well, and what didn’t go well in terms of the changes planned and the strategies (KS approaches) used.

The participants all prepared answers to these questions to be presented back to the group. Time was given after each presentation for questions, comments and discussion.

Other activities held in Day 2 included:

  • Report-back by synthesizers
  • Most Significant Change(MSC) stories presented by each project
  • Fishbowl exercise with two ‘outsiders’ discussing the MSC stories and criteria for selecting ‘best’ ones
  • Matrix exercise to look at the bigger ‘Why’ question and meaning around using KSinR

Further posts will be made on these activities, and results of all Synthesis workshop exercises will be available soon on the KS website.

ksinr-synthesis-workshop-011In the Inception workshop for the Knowledge Sharing in Research project, the Project Leader and Pilot projects all used the Impact Pathways approach to look at the actors who were considered necessary in the network around the particular project with whom relationships should be changed, strengthened or made in order to achieve success in the project. Changes in the particular actors were made explicit as well as the particular strategy which would be employed to bring this about.

In the recently held Synthesis workshop fo the project, all Pilot Projects were asked to revisit this concept by filling out an Outcome Logic Model table.

The Outcomes Logic Model asked participants to consider:

  • what actors were involved/influenced in the project
  • what changes occurred in them
  • what strategy was used to bring about such change
  • percentage completed or next steps to continue working on a particular actor’s change

ksinr-synthesis-workshop-108Each participant filled in the table and presented it either as a flip chart, on their computers or by speaking about it.

In the Knowledge Sharing in Research project’s Synthesis Workshop, held 17-19 November 2008 in Addisksinr-synthesis-workshop-040 Ababa, Ethiopia, a ‘River of Life’ exercise was used to facilitate the reviewing of all the KSinR Pilotksinr-synthesis-workshop-033 Projects and KSinR project.

In the River of Life exercise, all participants were asked to visualise their projectsksinr-synthesis-workshop-036 using a river metaphor. Using flip chart sheets stuck together, the projects were asked to draw a ‘river’ depicting the ‘life’ of their project including:ksinr-synthesis-workshop-035

  • activities
  • outputs
  • outcomesksinr-synthesis-workshop-054

This exercise was meant to facilitate the remembering, showing and documenting of allksinr-synthesis-workshop-039 that has happened in the projects, which is often difficult, through drawing rather than listing.

The ‘river’ metaphor also helped people to consider the logical flow along the project, showing the source, where there may have been some turbulence (rapids), certain branches which did not pan out, parallel streams of activities…and more.

While drawing the River of Life by each project, Sophie Alvarez and Boru Douthwaithe provided some suggestions and motivations to the projects in depicting their projects.

Once the drawing were finished these were mounted on the walls and pinboards around the room.ksinr-synthesis-workshop-102

Each Project was then asked to present their ‘River of Life’ to the group, explaining what had happened, what outputs were produced and what outcomes they thought had occurred.

ksinr-synthesis-workshop-068

ksinr-synthesis-workshop-066

ksinr-synthesis-workshop-013One of the first exercises at the recently held Knowledge Sharing in Research(KSinR) project’s Synthesis Workshop was to ask the participants what their expectations of the workshop were.

The participants were asked to write these on cards.

The cards were then read out and Nadia Manning-Thomas, Project Leader of the KSinR project was asked to say whether the particular expectation:

* Will be Achieved

* Maybe achieved

* Will NOT be achieved

The cards were then arranged on a pin board under the 3 categories-see photo to the right.

None of the expectations were considered to be not achievable in the workshop.

This board was referred to throughout the workshop to make sure the workshop was on track with meeting the needs and priorities of all involved.

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